March 2021 Social Security Disability Payment Schedule

If you receive Social Security Disability Benefits (SSDI or SSI) are wondering when you will get paid in March 2021, you’ve come to the right place. Tens of millions of Americans count on getting their Social Security Disability checks in a timely manner each month. Fortunately, The Social Security Administration (SSA) publishes a schedule on when beneficiaries can expect their disability checks each month. In this post, we will provide a detailed March 2021 Social Security Disability Payment Schedule.

However, first, we will explain the electronic payment requirements and why the Social Security Administration no longer mails paper checks.

Second, we will explain how the SSDI payment schedule works and provide the payment schedule for March 2021 and for the rest of the year for your convenience.

Third, we will explain how the SSI payment schedule works and provide the payment schedule for March 2021 and for the rest of the year for your convenience.

Finally, we will answer some of the most commonly asked SSDI and SSI disability questions.

"March 2021 Social Security Disability Payment Schedule"

This Post will Cover:

  • Social Security Disability Electronic Delivery of Payments
  • How SSDI Payment Schedule Works
  • March 2021 SSDI Payment Schedule
  • How SSI Payment Schedule Works
  • March 2021 SSI Payment Schedule
  • Social Security Disability Questions and Answers

Social Security Disability Electronic Delivery of Payments

The Social Security Administration no longer mails paper checks. Congress passed a law that required all government benefit payments to be made electronically.

This includes Social Security disability payments for SSI and SSDI.

There are two ways you can receive your benefits:

Option 1 – Direct deposit

First, you can choose to get your payments by direct deposit into a savings or checking account with a bank or credit union.

If you choose this method of payment, your benefits will be automatically posted into your bank account on your payment date.

Option 2 – Direct Express Debit Card:

Second, If you don’t have a bank account, your benefits will be paid via a Direct Express debit card.

The Direct Express card works like a bank debit card and is accepted anywhere Debit Mastercard is accepted.

In addition, you can use the card to get cash at ATMs, cash back at the grocery store, or to set up automatic payments for bills.

For how to sign up for the Direct Express debit card, click here.

Payments made to Direct Express debit cards are automatically posted to your card account on your payment date.

March 2021 Social Security Disability Payment Schedule

Here’s how the monthly payment schedule works for both SSDI and SSI Benefits:

SSDI Payment Schedule

For those receiving Social Security Disability Insurance benefits, when you receive your monthly SSDI benefits depends on your birthday.

We have explained below how it works.

How SSDI Payment Schedule Works

Here’s how the SSDI payment schedule works:

  • If your birthday is in the first 10 days of the month – regardless of what month of the year it is – then you’ll receive your Social Security Disability Insurance benefits on the second Wednesday of each month.
  • Those with birthdays between the 11th and the 20th get their monthly payments on the third Wednesday of the month.
  • Payments are made on the fourth Wednesday of the month for those with birthdays on the 21st or later.

Here is a table that better displays how the payment schedule works for SSDI:

BIRTHDAY PAYMENT DATE
1st – 10th Second Wednesday
11th – 20th Third Wednesday
21st – 31st Fourth Wednesday

Here is when to expect your Social Security Disability Insurance Payment for March 2021:

March 2021 SSDI Payment Schedule

For those receiving Social Security Retirement Benefit or Disability Benefits, here is your payment schedule for March:

  • If your birth date falls on the 1st – 10th day of the month, benefits are paid on March 10th.
  • Also, if your birth date falls on the 11th – 20th day of the month, benefits are paid on March 17th.
  • If your birth date falls on the 21st – 31st day of the month, benefits are paid on March 24th.

2021 SSDI Payments Schedule

Here is the complete 2021 Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) Payment Schedule for your reference.

This shows when you can expect your benefits payments for the rest of the year.

2021 SS & SSDI (Birthdate 1st – 10th) SS & SSDI (Birthdate 11th- 20th) SS & SSDI (Birthdate 21st – 31st)
January 13th 20th 27th
February 10th 17th 24th
March 10th 17th 24th
April 14th 21st 28th
May 12th 19th 26th
June 9th 16th 23rd
July 14th 21st 28th
August 11th 18th 25th
September 8th 15th 22nd
October 13th 20th 27th
November 10th 17th 24th
December 8th 15th 22nd

Key: SS means “Social Security Retirement Benefits”

Exceptions

If you started receiving benefits (SS or SSDI) Prior to May 1997, or you are currently receiving both Social Security and SSI payments, you will receive your payments on the 3rd of each month.

If the 3rd falls on a weekend or holiday, you will receive your payment on the preceding Friday.

The exception is when the 3rd falls on a weekend or holiday.

If the 3rd falls on a holiday, then you will receive your payment the business day before.

However, if the 3rd falls on a weekend, you’ll receive your payment on the preceding Friday.

SSI Payment Schedule

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) follows a different payment schedule than SSDI.

SSI payments are paid on the 1st of each month.

If a scheduled payment date falls on a weekend or federal holiday, payments are made on the first preceding day that isn’t a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday.

Here is when to expect your SSI Payment for March 2021:

March 2021 SSI Payment Schedule

Since March 1st, 2021 falls on a Monday, SSI payments for the month will be deposited on Monday, March 1st, 2021.

If you receive your payment via a bank account or a prepaid debit card like the Direct Express Debit card, you should see your benefits in your account on or before Monday, March 1st, 2021.

Both SS and SSI Recipients

Since March 3, 2021, is on a Wednesday, you will receive your benefits on Wednesday, March 3rd, 2021.

2021 SSI Payments Schedule

Here is the complete 2021 Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Payment Schedule for your reference.

This shows when you can expect your benefits payments for the rest of the year.

2021 SSI Only Both SS & SSI
January 31-Dec-2020 31-Dec-2020
February 1 3
March 1 3
April 1 2
May 30-Apr-2021 3
June 1 3
July 1 2
August 30-Jul-2021 3
September 1 3
October 1 1
November 1 3
December 1 3

Key: SS means “Social Security Retirement Benefits”

Here are the other schedules you may have missed:

January 2021
February 2021

Social Security Disability FAQs

Here are the most frequently asked questions about Social Security Disability Benefits.

What is the difference between SSI and SSDI?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) is in charge of two different disability programs, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

Social Security disability insurance is a Social Security program that pays monthly benefits to you if you become disabled before you reach retirement age and are not able to work.

In order to qualify, you have to  have earned enough work credits based on taxable employment in the past 10 years and meet the SSA’s definition of disability.

On the other hand, the Supplemental Security Income program is SSI is a need-based program for disabled individuals who haven’t earned enough work credits or haven’t worked at all to qualify for SSDI.

It provides basic financial assistance to older adults and persons with disabilities (regardless of age) with very limited income and resources.

What you need to qualify for SSI benefits depends on your age.

However, just like the SSDI program, to be approved for SSI, you have to not only meet the resources and income requirement but you also have meet the SSA’s definition of disability.

How Much Will I Receive in Disability Benefits if Approved?

The amount of your monthly disability payments depends on whether you are approved for SSI or SSDI.

Generally, SSDI recipients receive more money in monthly benefits than SSDI.

That is because SSDI beneficiaries have paid into the system through their payroll taxes.

On the other hand, SSI is paid to people who do not have the work history to qualify for SSDI and is needs based.

For 2021, the SSI federal base amount is $794 per month for an individual and $1,191 per month for a couple.

In addition, the SSI payment amounts are higher in states that pay a supplementary SSI payment.

Here are the average SSDI monthly benefit amounts for 2021:

The average SSDI disability benefit is $1,277, which is an increase of $16 from 2020.

How Easy is it to get Social Security Disability Benefits?

Getting approved for Social Security disability benefits, whether SSI or SSDI can take years.

That’s because on average, the Social Security Administration rejects over 70% of the applications in the initial stage.

However, the initial denial does not mean the end of the road.

That is because the SSA might deny a valid case for several reason, including the following:

  • The application may be missing medical documentation or may have insufficient medical evidence.
  • Some applications are rejected because they were not completed correctly.
  • Others may be rejected because of the applicant’s current work situation

If you are rejected in the initial phase, you can request a reconsideration, which is the first step in the appeals process

Approximately 12% of claimants who put in a request for reconsideration are approved.

If your case is denied at the reconsideration stage, you can then request a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ).

Approximately 35% of applications that reach the ALJ level are approved.

How Can I Improve my Chances of Getting Approved for Social Security Disability?

While no one can guarantee that your application for Social Security disability will be approved, an effective alternative to raise your chances of approval is to seek help through a disability advocate or attorney.

Disability advocates know how the social security system works and will efficiently handle your application by collecting all necessary evidence and documentation.

Furthermore, a disability advocate or attorney will also continue to help you through the appeals process should your initial application be denied.

Finally, if a disability advocate or attorney agrees to take your case, you don’t have to pay them until you win your claim, which is another reason to hire one.

Am I Allowed to Work While Receiving Disability Benefits?

Yes, you can. You can sign up for the Ticket to Work program from the Social Security Administration.

The Ticket to Work Program is designed to help those who are currently disabled get back into the workforce without immediately losing their benefits.

If you are approved for the program, there are two parts to the program.

Trial Period

First, you will enter the Trial Period.

The trial work period allows you to test your ability to work for at least nine months.

During your trial work period, you’ll receive your full Social Security benefits regardless of how much you’re earning as long as you report your work, and you continue to have a disability.

In 2020, a trial work month is any month your total earnings are over $910.

Furthermore, If you’re self-employed, you have a trial work month when you earn more than $910 (after business expenses) or work more than 80 hours in your own business.

The trial work period continues until you have used nine cumulative trial work months within a 60-month period.

Extended Period of Eligibility

Second, once your trial period ends and you enter the 36-month extended period of eligibility.

During the 36-month extended period of eligibility, you cannot make more than $1,260 ($2,110 if you are blind) a month in 2020 or your benefits will stop.

After your trial work period, you have 36 months during which you can work and still receive benefits for any month your earnings aren’t “substantial.”

In 2020, the Social Security Administration considers earnings over $1,260 ($2,110 if you’re blind) to be substantial.

However, the Social Security Administration deducts the work expenses you have because of your disability when they count your earnings.

Therefore, If you have extra work expenses, your earnings could be substantially higher than $1,260 in 2020 before they affect your benefits.

Will my disability benefit go up if my disability gets worse?

Unfortunately, your disability payments will not go up if your disability gets worse.

Your SSDI or SSI payments do not change if your condition becomes more severe.

That is because your SSDI benefits are based on your earnings history, not the level of your disability.

Also, should you be approved for SSDI, your disability benefit payment will be the same as a full retirement benefit.

The full retirement benefit is the amount you would have received based on your work record if you had been at full retirement age when you became disabled.

Furthermore, the same holds true for Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

SSI payments are not based on your lifetime earnings record, but your current income and household financial circumstances do affect them.

However, your SSI benefit can change if your earnings or household circumstances change, but it won’t be based on your worsening condition.

 

March 2021 Social Security Disability Payment Schedule Summary

Here’s the bottom line:

Social Security no longer pays benefits by check.

You can receive your SSDI or SSI benefits by direct deposit or via a Direct Express debit card.

When you receive your monthly SSDI benefits depends on your birthday.

SSI payments are paid on the 1st of each month.

If a scheduled payment date falls on a weekend or federal holiday, payments are made on the first preceding day that isn’t a Saturday, Sunday, or holiday.

Questions?

We hope this post on the March 2021 Social Security Disability Payment Schedule was helpful.

If you have further questions about Social Security Disability benefits, please let us know in the comments section below.

Be sure to check out our other articles on Social Security Disability. 

Leave a Reply